This week in Arizona history - The Explorer: Pima Pinal

This week in Arizona history

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Posted: Tuesday, May 20, 2008 11:00 pm | Updated: 8:03 am, Thu Mar 24, 2011.

On Wednesday, May 21, 1931, border patrolmen discovered the skeleton of a 25,000-year-old mammoth near Hereford.

On this date in 1954, Dean Byron Cummings, professor of archaeology at the University of Arizona and the first white man to see Rainbow Ridge, died.

THURSDAY, MAY 22

On this date in 1894, Dr. A.E. Douglass selected a site in Flagstaff for the Lowell Observatory.

On this date in 1923, four people died in an explosion at the Apache Powder Plant at Benson.

On this date in 1925, an 80-foot, solid copper flagpole, donated by Inspiration Consolidated Copper Co., was erected in front of the American Legion building in Miami.

On this date in 1925, a wolf-like pack of 15 or 20 wild dogs killed livestock and terrorized children in the Silverbell Road area near Tucson.

On this date in 1925, citizens of Bisbee formed the Bisbee Volunteer Forest Fire Fighting Corps which was to consist of 13 groups of four men each, trained in firefighting.

FRIDAY, MAY 23

 On this date in 1868, Col. Christopher “Kit” Carson, who directed the campaign against the Navajos which resulted in their surrender and the exile of about half the tribe to Fort Sumner between 1864 and 1868, died at Fort Lyon, Colo. just nine days before the June 1 signing of the treaty which allowed the Navajos to return to their homeland.

On this date in 1919, the Secretary of the Arizona Livestock Board reported that Cochise County was swarming with cattle rustlers.

On this date in 1927, one person died and several were injured when two Santa Fe trains crashed near Flagstaff.

SATURDAY, MAY 24

On this date in 1869, John Wesley Powell and his party began their historic exploration of the Colorado River.

On this date in 1915, Arizona and California celebrated the opening of the new “Ocean to Ocean” highway bridge at Yuma.

On this date in 1925, R.J. Jones of Phoenix, who owned a 160-acre tract of land located a mile and a half from the Casa Grande ruins, announced that the land would be subdivided and a new town called Coolidge would be built.

On this date in 1930, the State of Arizona presented a bronze statue of John Campbell Greenway to Statuary Hall in Washington, D.C.

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